Osteoarthritis - Valley Sports Medicine

Arthritis is a complex family of musculoskeletal disorders consisting of more than 100 different diseases or conditions that can affect people of all ages, races, and genders. Arthritis is not just a disease of old age. Two-thirds of people with arthritis are under the age of 65, including 300,000 children.  In the U.S. an estimated 22.7% (54.4 million) of adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis.  Women are more commonly affected (23.5%) than men (18.1 million.)

Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as “wear and tear” arthritis, is the most common form of arthritis.  It is a progressive degenerative joint disease characterized by inflammation and the breakdown of joint cartilage.  Risk factors for developing OA include injury to the joint, overuse of the joint, weak thigh muscles, genetics, obesity, and age.

OA is a chronic condition in which the material that cushions the joints, called cartilage, breaks down. This increases the stress and pressure on the bones, causing stiffness, pain and loss of joint movement. The cause is not fully understood, but increasingly it appears that it starts with some type of inflammation in the joint, leading to cartilage loss. Osteoarthritis gradually worsens with time, and no cure currently exists. But osteoarthritis treatments can slow the progression of the disease, relieve pain and improve joint function and quality of life.

At Valley Sports Physicians we’ve been treating OA successfully with non-surgical options since 1995.  Few practices in the country have our level of skill and experience.  For more information about OA, and to learn about the various treatment options we offer, including our Regenerative Medicine treatments, click here for our free e-book on Osteoarthritis.

OA is a chronic condition in which the material that cushions the joints, called cartilage, breaks down. This causes the bones to rub against each other, causing stiffness, pain and loss of joint movement. The cause is not fully understood. Osteoarthritis gradually worsens with time, and no cure exists. But osteoarthritis treatments can slow the progression of the disease, relieve pain and improve joint function.